I’m on holiday until the 17th of August and although there’s no queue.
See you all upon my return!

(Source: bassman5911)

peashooter85:

An ivory handled pinfire pepperbox revolver, mid 19th century.

(Source: jokerrabit)

kruegerwaffen:

Me 410 B-2/U-2/R-4 bomber destroyer, this aircraft carried a foward firing armament of four 20 mm canno, four 7.9 mm machine guns and four launchers for 21 cm mortars

arsarteetlabore:

Gueorgui Pinkhassov , Self-portrait in a courtyard of Baku, Azerbaijan. 1976

arsarteetlabore:

Gueorgui Pinkhassov , Self-portrait in a courtyard of Baku, Azerbaijan. 1976

celiabasto:

100% ART

(Source: hakkalocken)

robotday2012 by Samizé

(Source: bassman5911)

Medical Officers Training Camp - Motorcycle Courier, Fort Riley. 1917 (via)

(Source: bassman5911)

Space Aliens by twm1340 on Flickr.

Lisboa, Portugal 

Fotografia sem data. Produzida durante a actividade do Estúdio Mário Novais: 1933-1983.

via Biblioteca de Arte-Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian

(Source: bassman5911)

  1. Camera: Hasselblad H1D
peashooter85:

The Hopkins and Allen Vest Derringer,
In the late 19th and early 20th century Hopkins and Allen was one of the three major manufacturers of cheap break top and pocket revolvers, competitors with Iver Johnson and Harrington & Richardson.  In 1911 Hopkins and Allen introduced a small single shot .22 short vest pistol that was an attempt to compete in a more highbrow market.  The Hopkins and Allen derringer was a simple break top derringer that could easily fit in the palm of ones hand.  At the time it was probably one of the smallest pistols on the market.  To make the pistol more compact, it lacked a trigger guard but feature a fold out trigger.
In an attempt to attract high class customers, every Hopkins and Allen vest derringer came complete with factory engraving, pearl grips, and a shiny brass Hopkins and Allen medallion.  As a result, the Hopkins and Allen derringer was significantly more expensive than pocket pistols of its type.  Unfortunately the Hopkins and Allen made the derringer too fancy.  People wanted cheap pocket pistols, fancy decorated derringers were not only too expensive, but were quickly worn down by rigors of pocket carry.  Hence, few people carried expensive, pretty, shiny pocket pistols knowing that they would become worn. In addition .22 short is one of the weakest calibers in production, hardly a manstopper, and the effectiveness of the Hopkins and Allen derringer was limited by its one anemic shot.  Production ended in 1915, with only 1,400 being produced.  Today they are very collectible, ranging in price from $1000 - $4,000 depending on condition. peashooter85:

The Hopkins and Allen Vest Derringer,
In the late 19th and early 20th century Hopkins and Allen was one of the three major manufacturers of cheap break top and pocket revolvers, competitors with Iver Johnson and Harrington & Richardson.  In 1911 Hopkins and Allen introduced a small single shot .22 short vest pistol that was an attempt to compete in a more highbrow market.  The Hopkins and Allen derringer was a simple break top derringer that could easily fit in the palm of ones hand.  At the time it was probably one of the smallest pistols on the market.  To make the pistol more compact, it lacked a trigger guard but feature a fold out trigger.
In an attempt to attract high class customers, every Hopkins and Allen vest derringer came complete with factory engraving, pearl grips, and a shiny brass Hopkins and Allen medallion.  As a result, the Hopkins and Allen derringer was significantly more expensive than pocket pistols of its type.  Unfortunately the Hopkins and Allen made the derringer too fancy.  People wanted cheap pocket pistols, fancy decorated derringers were not only too expensive, but were quickly worn down by rigors of pocket carry.  Hence, few people carried expensive, pretty, shiny pocket pistols knowing that they would become worn. In addition .22 short is one of the weakest calibers in production, hardly a manstopper, and the effectiveness of the Hopkins and Allen derringer was limited by its one anemic shot.  Production ended in 1915, with only 1,400 being produced.  Today they are very collectible, ranging in price from $1000 - $4,000 depending on condition.

peashooter85:

The Hopkins and Allen Vest Derringer,

In the late 19th and early 20th century Hopkins and Allen was one of the three major manufacturers of cheap break top and pocket revolvers, competitors with Iver Johnson and Harrington & Richardson.  In 1911 Hopkins and Allen introduced a small single shot .22 short vest pistol that was an attempt to compete in a more highbrow market.  The Hopkins and Allen derringer was a simple break top derringer that could easily fit in the palm of ones hand.  At the time it was probably one of the smallest pistols on the market.  To make the pistol more compact, it lacked a trigger guard but feature a fold out trigger.

In an attempt to attract high class customers, every Hopkins and Allen vest derringer came complete with factory engraving, pearl grips, and a shiny brass Hopkins and Allen medallion.  As a result, the Hopkins and Allen derringer was significantly more expensive than pocket pistols of its type.  Unfortunately the Hopkins and Allen made the derringer too fancy.  People wanted cheap pocket pistols, fancy decorated derringers were not only too expensive, but were quickly worn down by rigors of pocket carry.  Hence, few people carried expensive, pretty, shiny pocket pistols knowing that they would become worn. In addition .22 short is one of the weakest calibers in production, hardly a manstopper, and the effectiveness of the Hopkins and Allen derringer was limited by its one anemic shot.  Production ended in 1915, with only 1,400 being produced.  Today they are very collectible, ranging in price from $1000 - $4,000 depending on condition.